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Areas I Work With

Hope

Anxiety & Depression

We all feel down from time to time, however it’s important to get help if these feelings persist or impact your day-to-day life.
 

Anxiety and depression can exist independently, although they commonly occur together, and they are one of the ways our mind and body inform us that something needs our attention. Although painful, there can be wisdom in the discomfort, and this is often what brings us to therapy.

 

Exploring our feelings can uncover experiences from our past which may shape our view of ourselves and the world in the present. Therapy can provide healing dialogue, making space for you to feel safe enough to explore and make sense of your internal world, allowing positive change to occur.

Loss of Identity & Self-Worth

Sometimes life transitions such as moving, a change in health, or starting or ending a job or relationship, can cause us to question who we are. We might feel disconnected from our lives, doing what we think we should be doing, and wondering if that’s truly what we want.

 

When we feel unsure of ourselves, we may crave reassurance in unhealthy ways, such as through people-pleasing, status-chasing, or investing too much in our appearance. This can lead us to feel overburdened, empty and exhausted.
 

Awareness that you feel this way is one of the first steps towards finding yourself again. Giving yourself the opportunity to explore who you are, behind the mask, can be a liberating and empowering experience.

Image by Kelly Sikkema
Calm Woman

Bereavement & Grief

Grief is a very individual experience, and it’s natural to go through a range of physical and emotional processes as we experience loss.

 

You may feel deep sadness, depression, numbness, confusion, or anger. You may even feel a sense of relief, especially if you had a difficult relationship with the person who died, or if they were suffering. There is no right or wrong way to process loss, and everyone grieves in their own time.
 

Grief isn't something we only experience when someone dies. Endings, such as loss of a relationship, or an absent parent, can evoke similar emotional responses and impact our sense of wellbeing. 

 

Therapy offers a chance to explore your feelings and memories without judgment. No loss is too big or too small to warrant support.

The Pandemic - Collective Trauma, Grief and Loss

During the pandemic we’ve experienced collective loss and grieved together. We’ve all lost something, whether that’s the loss of a loved one, loss of employment, changes in our own health, or freedom during lockdowns. We've also lost our sense of safety, control, and the belief we can protect those we care about. Many of us have had to put our life plans on an indefinite hold, and have experienced significant disconnection and isolation.
 

It's important to remember that it’s ok to grieve when you’ve lost something. When we start to accept and acknowledge our sadness, we can begin the process of moving forward.

Image by Ravi Roshan